0

Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Volume 1, Fourth Edition

  • Author(s)/Editor(s):
  • Published:
    2012
  • DOI:
    10.1115/1.859865
Description | Details

This fourth edition of the “Companion Guide” of ASME Pressure Vessel & Piping Codes has been updated to the current (2010) Code Edition and (2011) Addenda. This edition has 38 chapters authored by 49 experts who have considerably updated and extensively re-written chapters, as well as provided entirely new chapters. Unlike the third edition, this fully updated and revised fourth edition is a classic reference work in a convenient two-volume format that focuses on all twelve sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes, as well as relevant Piping Codes and Standards. The first two volumes covering Code Sections I through XII consider the dramatic changes in the industry, state of the art of technology and regulatory practices. Organizational Changes of Boiler & Pressure Vessel Committees are included in the front matter of both volumes of this publication. A unique feature of this publication is the inclusion of all author biographies and an introduction that synthesizes every chapter, along with an extensive index including over 7500 individual terms.

  • Copyright:
    All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. ©  2012  ASME
  • ISBN:
    9780791859865
  • No. of Pages:
    900
  • Order No.:
    859865
Front Matter PUBLIC ACCESS
PDF
  • PART 1: POWER BOILERS — SECTIONS I & VII OF B&PV CODE

    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      Power Boilers, Section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, provides rules for the construction of power boilers, but since it is neither a textbook nor a design handbook, its rules are accompanied by very little explanation. The objective of this chapter is to provide an overview of Section I rules, their intent, and how they are applied and enforced.This chapter is an abbreviated version of the book Power Boilers, A Guide to Section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code [1]. That comprehensive guide was used as the textbook for a two-day ASME Professional Development Department course on Section I, developed and taught by Martin D. Bernstein and Lloyd Yoder. The Second Edition [2] of the book, Power Boilers, A Guide to Section I of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code was published in May 2011. After a 10 year hiatus the ASME Professional Development course on Section I has been reinstated and scheduled for early in 2012. The course instructor, Robert G. McLaughlin, Vice-Chairman of BPVI, will be using the second edition of The Power Boiler Guide Book as the text book for this ASME Professional Development course.
    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      ASME Section VII, Recommended Guidelines for the Care of Power Boilers, falls within the purview of the BPV Committee on Power Boilers (BPV I). There have been no significant changes to Section VII for the last several Editions and as of this writing neither BPV I nor the ASME Board on Pressure Technology Codes and Standards (BPTCS) have plans to update the document. With that said, Section VII remains very useful tool for operators of power boilers to follow. As stated in the Introduction of Section VII:The purpose of these recommended guidelines is to promote safety in the use of power boilers. These guidelines are intended for use by those directly responsible for operating, maintaining, and inspecting power boilers.As with other ASME Sections, the nine subsections — C1–C9 — of Section VII discuss guidelines for safe, reliable operation as well as avoiding unsafe conditions in the power boilers.This chapter is written from the perspective of Owner— Operators personnel experienced in operating, maintaining, and inspecting industrial and utility power boilers. Certain parts of this chapter are, in some instances, reiterations of Section VII subsections, which was done to stress the importance of the information already provided; in other instances, however, additional information is provided where it is felt to be warranted. Where there are no comments on a section, the material is believed to have been covered sufficiently to not need additional clarification. The reader is suggested to review existing literature, such as manufacturer's instructions or company procedures, for additional pertinent information.
  • PART 2: SECTION II OF B&PV CODE

    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      The first (1914) edition [1] of Rules for the Construction of Stationary Boilers and for Allowable Working Pressures was adopted in the spring of 1915 [2]. The book consisted of 114 pages, of which 35 pages—the first 178 paragraphs—were dedicated to materials. Part I of the 1914 edition was dedicated to Section I (Power Boilers). Material specifications were provided in Section I for important materials used in the construction of boilers. Only riveted construction was permitted; the specifications included the materials permitted for rivets. The material requirement was that the rivets be made of steel or iron and be manufactured to specifications written specifically for Boiler—Rivet Steel or Iron. It must be noted that fusion-welded construction for pressure-boundary parts was not permitted until the 1931 Edition of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code was published.The materials, for the most part, were similar to those of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM); however, they were not duplicates. Meetings were held between representatives of ASTM and the Boiler Code Committee; consequently, in the 1918 Edition of the Boiler Code there was a much closer agreement between the ASME Boiler Code and those used for the ASTM Specifications.Specifications provided in Part I of Section I (Power Boilers) included materials needed for the design and fabrication of power boilers. The specifications included in the 1914 Edition of the Boiler Code are shown in Table 3.1.1. For the most part, Firebox-quality steel was to be used. (Steels were designated Firebox and Flange quality, the former having a higher quality than the latter [3].) The specifications in the first edition of the Boiler Code were unique to the needs of that time and therefore bear no resemblance to those in the current 2010 Edition of Section II.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code was first published by the ASME in 1915 as the “Rules for the Construction of Stationary Boiler and for Allowable Working Pressures” in the Report of the Committee to Formulate Standard Specifications for the Construction of Steam Boilers and Other Pressure Vessels and their Care in Service. The Committee was officially known as the Boiler Code Committee. The document was 114 pages , and the scope was identified as follows:These Rules do not apply to boilers which are subject to federal inspection and control, including marine boilers, boilers of steam locomotive and other self-propelled railroad apparatus.The Rules are divided into two parts. PART I applies to new installations (Section I, Power Boilers; Section II, Heating Boilers). PART II applies to existing installations.The purpose of the Code was to address the needs of the industry with regard to safety of fired steam boilers. The problem the Code was intended to address was that explosions of steam boilers were killing hundreds of people each year and causing great damage. From the turn of the century to 1915, thousands of deaths were caused by boiler explosions. The ASME addressed the issue by requesting engineers from industry to volunteer their time to write a set of engineering rules that could be adopted into state laws to ensure the proper construction of steam boilers [1]. In the 50 years after the Code was first published, the number of deaths caused by explosions of properly operated boilers and pressure vessels was reduced to essentially zero when the construction rules of the ASME Code were met. Subsequently, this outstanding record of safety has remained intact. No other industry has a better safety record.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This chapter describes the general requirements of Section III applicable to all Classes of construction, including steel vessels, piping, pumps, and valves, as well as concrete structures. It identifies how to classify components and describes how the jurisdictional boundaries of Section III define what is within and outside the scope of the Code. Use of Code Editions and Addenda and Code Cases is explained. The requirements for Design Basis, Design and Construction Specifications, and Design Reports are described. Furthermore, the chapter addresses the responsibilities and Quality Assurance Program requirements of the different entities involved in constructing a nuclear power plant, from the manufacturer of materials to the Owner. Requirements for ASME accreditation, application of the ASME Code Symbol Stamp, and use of Code Data Reports are also described.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This chapter discusses the structural limits in Section III NB and Section VIII Div 2 as related to specific structural failure modes considered applicable to pressure vessel and piping design. The rules and requirements for Section III NB and Section VIII Div 2 are based on design by analysis philosophy addressing specific structural failure modes of structural collapse, rupture, instability, fatigue, and progressive deformation. Beam, plate, and shell theory have been used in the past to develop design analysis methods. These methods are giving way to finite element analysis (FEA) methods that are commonplace in engineering practice today. This chapter discussed ways to use FEA to show compliance with the ASME Code structural design limits. The applicability of linear versus non-linear analysis assumptions are discussed relative to the failure mode being addressed. Examples are given with guidelines on use of current tools to address these failure modes. Comments on the direction for development of new tools are given. Also discussed is the development of fracture mechanics methods to address ductile and brittle fracture failure modes as required in Appendix G, in Section XI, and often in the context of Section III NB design requirements. Comments are provided on the limitations of deterministic assessments as made in the current Section III NB assessment with respect to new initiatives into reliable design methods based on probabilistic concepts.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        In the first Edition, the principal author, Mr. Thomas J. Am, made extensive references to Section VIII, Division 2, and these references remain in both the second and third Editions. Users of this Chapter of the Companion Guide should be aware that in the 2007 Edition of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 2, Alternative Rules for Construction of Pressure Vessels, was completely rewritten and revised. This “New” Section VIII, Division 2 has little conformity with the rules of “Old” Section VIII, Division 2. The rules for “Design by Analysis” were first embodied in the 1963 Edition of Section III, Nuclear Vessels, for Class A Vessels (today's Class 1 vessels), and later used as the Alternative Rules published in the 1968 Edition of Section VIII, Division 2. These design rules utilized Design Stress lntensities based on the Maximum Shear Stress Theory of Failure (the Tresca Criterion) and the design values were based on a design factor of of the Tensile Strength and of the Yield Strength. Permitted materials were restricted, and temperature limits were established at 700_F for carbon and low alloy steels, and 800_F for austenitic and high temperature alloys. Many fabrication details permitted in Section VIII, Division 1, were not included in construction details for the Alternative Rules. Section III, Class 2 vessels designed by analysis in NC-3200 still abide by the rules of the “Old” Section VIII, Division 2, up to the 2004 Edition, including the 2005 and 2006 Addenda. The “New” Section VIII, Division 2, 2007 Edition, still refers to “Design Stress Intensities,” but they are based on the Maximum Stress Theory of Failure (von Mises Criteria), and they are based on a design factor of 1/2.4 of the Tensile Strength. Many of the construction details not previously permitted have been included. Section III has not even begun to study this disparity in design and construction, and has not considered approval of the “New” Section VIII, Division 2. Therefore, in using this Chapter, do not reference the 2007 Edition of Section VIII, Division 2. All references are to the “Old” Section VIII, Division 2, 2004 Edition with 2005 and 2006 Addenda. For a complete discussion on the rewrite, please refer to Chapter 22.
  • PART 3: SECTION III — RULES FOR CONTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        Previous discussion in Chapter 5 indicates that three classes of components are provided in the requirements of Section III, Division 1 [1]. Each class can be considered a quality level, with Class 1 being the highest and Class 3 the lowest. These levels of quality exist because of the various requirements for each class in Section III that relate to the following: materials, fabrication, installation, examination, and design. Design is listed last because there is sufficient evidence to indicate that the other considerations listed are of more importance than (or at least equal to) the design requirements. The following discussion will address service limits and loading conditions classified as Levels A, B, C, and D. The Code is not responsible for this classification; instead, it is the responsibility of the owner to satisfy the regulatory and enforcement authority requirements. Once loading conditions are designated in the Design Specifications as Level A, B, C, or D, the Code provides acceptance criteria.The Code rules assure that violation of the pressure boundary will not occur if the Design Specification satisfactorily addresses all those issues necessary for Code compliance. This assurance is provided in the following two ways:1) protection against catastrophic failure, and2) protection against initiation and propagation of a crack or propagation of a Section III acceptable flaw through the pressure boundary.The following discussion on piping will address how Section III provides this protection, any variations that exist or that have existed between the piping rules and the design-by-analysis rules, and what items the analyst should be concerned with in satisfying Code requirements.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This chapter provides a summary of some of the more significant requirements of the ASME Code Section III, Subsection NE, and a commentary on such requirements. The comments on and interpretation of the rules are strictly the opinions of the authors and are not to be considered as official ASME Code Committee interpretations. These opinions are based on several years of experience in design, analysis, and construction of containment vessels and participation in various ASME Code Committees.The Code requirements cited may be simplified and abbreviated in this write-up and may not reflect all details of the rules. The applicable edition of the Code must be consulted for actual applications. Some comparisons with the rules of Section VIII are included for information. The analysis procedures are not dealt with in any great detail, since they are similar to those of Subsection NB and Section VIII, Division 2 prior to the 2007 Edition. More emphasis has been placed on the unique features of Subsection NE.A number of Code Cases and references that pertain to the rules of this Subsection have been cited. Again, only the points significant to the item of discussion have been included here. For a complete understanding, the entire reference should be consulted. This chapter is based on the 2007 Edition of the Code.
      • Chapter 10. 

        Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        On December 31, 1973, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) published Subsection NF [1] of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, Division 1 (hereafter addressed as Subsection NF) as part of the winter 1973 addenda to the 1971 Code edition [2]. This was a historic publication; prior to it, supports (also called pipe hangers and restraints) were not addressed as part of ASME Section III. Existing nuclear plants and plants under construction during that time were using ANSI B31.1 [3], ANSI B31.7 [4], MSS-SP58 [5], and the AISC Manual of Steel Construction [6] to design supports. ASME Section III, Subsection NF, provided a stabilizing position for future nuclear plant support design by designating a single source of rules for the design, construction, fabrication, and examination of supports.This criteria-and-commentary chapter provides information on the origins and evolution of design rules and is intended to allow designers, engineers, and fabricators to make better use of Subsection NF of the ASME Code. Topics of greatest interest are discussed and addressed from both a technical and historical viewpoint. It is not the intent, however, to address every detail or anticipate every question associated with the use of the subsection. However, there will be situations when engineering judgment and special considerations will be used in conjunction with Subsection NF to qualify supports.ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III, Division 1, Subsection NF, was developed in an attempt to provide rules for the estimated 10,000 piping and component supports existing in a typical nuclear power plant. These rules have evolved so dramatically that the existing support rules seldom resemble the original rules of 1973. This document follows the evolution of Subsection NF as the industry attempted to apply the subsection's rules. Commentary is provided to explain how the criteria are used, the source and technical basis for the equations and the rationale, and the reasons for change. It is anticipated that readers will develop a better understanding of Subsection NF to appreciate its complexities and usefulness.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This Chapter provides commentary and practical examples on the materials, design, fabrication, installation, and examination requirements for Core Support Structures (CSS) in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NG of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel (ASME B&PV) Code [1]. In addition, commentary is provided on Section XI [2] of the Code, as the rules apply to CSS repair, replacement, examination, and inspection requirements.The 4th Edition of this Chapter has been updated to reflect the 2010 Edition of the ASME B&PV Code with 2011 Addenda, and includes commentary on the following topics:• Background on Subsection NG Development• Definition of Class CS and Jurisdictional Boundaries• Discussion of Typical Materials Used• Design By Analysis Rules and Allowable Limits• Owner's Design Specification and Design Reports• Fabrication, Installation, and Examination• Environmental Effects• Selected Interpretations and Code Cases Applicable to NG• Improvements and Future Developments in Subsection NG• Material Degradation Issues• Compatibility of Subsection NG with Other International Codes• Realistic Design Loads for Reactor Internals• Summary of Changes to 2010 Edition of the ASME Code for CSS
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        The purpose of this chapter is to provide background information on the development and application of the rules for construction of elevated temperature components for nuclear service. Subsection NH of Section III, 2011a Addenda [1] contains the rules for Class 1 nuclear components consisting of vessels, pumps, valves, and piping systems. The rules for Class 2 and 3 Components and Core Support Structures are contained in a series of Code Cases [2–5]. The above rules cover all aspects of construction: materials, design, fabrication, inspection, overpressure protection, testing, and marking. In Section III, “elevated temperature” has been defined as 700°F for ferritic steels and 800°F for austenitic stainless steels and nickel base alloys. At and below these temperatures the rules for construction of Class 1, 2, and 3 Components and Core Support Structures are contained in Subsections NB [6], NC [7], ND [8], and NG [9], respectively, 2011a Addenda. Additionally, as discussed in Chapter 17, a new division of Section III, Division V has been issued to provide a central source for the construction rules for advanced high temperature reactors.The purpose of the early code cases for elevated temperature service, which subsequently became Subsection NH, was to provide rules for construction which account for the effects of deformation and damage due to creep with the same rigor that Subsection NB addressed the temperature regime below which creep effects are significant. In 1963, Code Case 1331 was issued covering design rules for elevated temperature Class 1 components. The early versions of Code Case 1331 were relatively limited in scope and it was not until Code Case 1331-5 [10] was issued in 1971 that the basic design provisions of what is now Subsection NH were incorporated. In 1974 a series of Code Cases, 1592–1596 [12–16], were issued which covered all aspects of elevated temperature construction for Class 1 components. Subsequently, additional cases were issued covering Class 2 and 3 components and core support structures.In 1976, three articles [16–18] were published in the Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology which covered the development of the rules for construction (all aspects), design, and buckling, respectively, of Section III, Class 1 components in elevated temperature service. Also, in 1976 a document titled “Criteria for Design of Elevated Temperature Class 1 Components” [19] was issued that was analogous to the criteria document for Class 1 Components [20] covered by Subsection NB. These first four references form the core of much of the discussion in this chapter related to Class 1 components; modified and expanded to cover the many revisions and additions to the rules occurring after their publication. An excellent reference on the application of elevated temperature design criteria from a world-wide perspective is the four-volume set “Recommended Practices in Elevated Temperature Design: A Compendium of Breeder Reactor Experiences (1970–1987),” edited by A. K. Dhalla and issued by the Welding Research Council [21–24]. Although there were many contributing organizations in the United States and worldwide through exchange agreements and voluntary contributions, the focal point for development of the criteria in Subsection NH was the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Unfortunately, there is no bibliography of their many reports and publications; however, certain of these are referenced in the applicable sections of this chapter.
      • Chapter 13. 

        Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        Pumps are the driving forces in fluid systems for nuclear power plants. The pump in each system drives the fluid through the piping to provide transfer of energy from one component to another. A pump is used in the main reactor circulating system to create the fluid flow that transfers the heated water to the steam generator. A pump provides the coolant flow that serves the steam condenser. There are pumps in all the fluid systems that make up a nuclear power plant. Fluid systems have varying degrees of importance depending on their function. The reactor cooling system is critical to maintaining the temperature of the fuel charge and transferring energy to the steam generator. The reactor coolant pump provides flow in this system. The steam system transfers energy from the steam generator to the turbine and then to the condenser. Cooling water supplied by a pump that circulates water from a coolant source through the condenser and back to its source condenses the steam. In addition to these primary fluid systems there are many others that provide for operation of the plant. Some of these systems are related to the safe operation of the power plant. Others are non Code and not safety related and therefore are not covered by the requirements of the Code. This commentary will explain how the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) requirements are implemented for Code nuclear pumps.
      • Chapter 14. 

        Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        The primary function of valves is to control the flow of fluids. Valve functions include the following:1. Starting and stopping flow2. Regulating flow-throttling3. Preventing reverse flow-checking reverse flow4. Changing flow direction5. Limiting pressure-pressure reliefValves are selected to perform these functions in fluid systems for nuclear power plants. The valves control the flow through these nuclear plant fluid systems and thus the operation of the systems. Nuclear plant fluid systems have varying degrees of importance depending on their function. The reactor cooling system is critical to maintaining the temperature of the fuel charge and transferring energy to the steam generator. The steam system transfers energy from the steam generator to the turbine and then to the condenser. In addition to these primary fluid systems there are many others that provide for operation of the plant. Some of these systems are related to the safe operation of the power plant. Others are not safety related and therefore are not covered by the requirements of the Code. This commentary will explain how the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) requirements are implemented for safety-related nuclear valves.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This Chapter describes the bases and provisions of the Code for Concrete Containments. It describes the concrete containment general environment, types of existing containments, future containment configurations, and background development including the regulatory bases of concrete containment construction code requirements. The description covers sequentially the following topics: Introduction, Concrete Reactor Containments, Types of Containments, Future Containments, Regulatory Bases for the Code Development, Background Development of the Code, Reinforced Concrete Containment Behavior, Containment Design Analysis and Related Testing, Code Design Requirements, Fabrication and Construction, Construction Testing and Examination, Containment Structural Integrity Testing, Containment Overpressure Protection, Stamping and Reports, Containment Structure and Aircraft Impact, Containment and Severe Accident Considerations, Other Relevant Information, Summary and Conclusion.The original editions of this chapter were developed by John D. Stevenson. Additional information relating to the regulatory basis for the code requirements, future containments and considerations for future revisions to the code was provide by Hansraj Asher, Barry Scott and Joseph Artuso. The basic format of this chapter is kept the same as in the previous editions. The current edition of this chapter brings the material up to date with the 2010 version of the Code and was prepared by Joseph Artuso, Arthur Eberhardt, Michael Hessheimer, Ola Jovall and Clayton Smith.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        In 1997, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) issued the initial version of Division 3 of Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. Prior to the publication of Division 3, Section III had only two divisions: Division 1 for metal construction and Division 2 for concrete construction. Division 3 was added to address the containments of nuclear transportation packagings. Hence, the ASME Subgroup responsible for Division 3 has been commonly referred to as “Subgroup NUPACK” even though its official name is the Subgroup on Containment Systems for Spent Fuel and High-Level Waste Transport Packagings. Consistent with current ASME BPV Code practice, the concern of this Division is primarily the integrity of the containment under design, operating, and test conditions. In particular, the structural and leak integrity of the containment is the focus of the Division 3 rules. Subgroup NUPACK is also concerned with aspects of containment closure functionality because the potential for leakage is a key consideration in the containment function of a transport cask or storage containment. Division 3 covers all “construction” aspects of the containment, which is ASME BPV Code terminology that includes administrative requirements, material selection, material qualification, design, fabrication, examination, inspection, testing, quality assurance, and documentation.
      • Show Sections

        Hide Sections

        This chapter provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. This chapter provides information on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.
  • PART 4: HEATING BOILERS - SECTION IV & VI OF B&PV CODE

    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      To help the reader understand and use the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, this chapter for ASME Code Section IV2 (2010 edition) is presented in a simplified manner with the understanding that it is not a Codebook and was not written to replace the Codebook published by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).Although the rules of the ASME B&PV Code, Section IV constitute the minimum requirements for the safe design, construction, installation, and inspection of low-pressure-steam boilers and hotwater boilers (which are directly fired with oil, gas, electricity, or other solid or liquid fuels), they do not cover the operation, repair, alteration, rerating, and maintenance of such boilers. By definition, a low-pressure-steam boiler is a steam boiler in which the operating pressure does not exceed 15 psi (103 kPa), whereas a hot-water boiler is defined as a boiler used for an operating pressure not exceeding 160 psi (1,100 kPa) and/or for a temperature not exceeding 250_F (121_C). Hot-water boilers include hot-waterheating boilers and hot-water-supply boilers. Also covered by the rules of Section IV are potable-water heaters and water-storage tanks for operation at pressures not exceeding 160 psi (1,100 kPa) and water temperatures not exceeding 210_F (99_C).
    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      Although heating boilers are designed and constructed safely under Section IV, the rules of Section VI are recommended for their care and operation. These rules are non-mandatory, unless adopted into law, guidelines for the safe and efficient operation of steam-heating boilers, hot-water-supply boilers, and hot-water-heating boilers after installation (however, they are not applicable to potable water heaters). It should be noted that this chapter generally follows the format of Section VI; where additional information is considered beneficial, it has been added.
  • PART 5: SECTION V OF B&PV CODE

    • Show Sections

      Hide Sections

      The purpose of this chapter is to provide users of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section V [1] an insight into the significant Section V requirements, NDE methods, and NDE methodology, as well as the relation of Section V to other ASME book sections and to the use of the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standards [2]. The information provided in this chapter is based on the 2010 edition of Section V with 2011 addenda, dated July 1, 2011.The charter and scope for the Committee for Section V (BPV V) is to develop and maintain Code rules for NDE methodology and equipment involved in surface and volumetric testing methods. These test methods are used for the detection and sizing of defects, discontinuities, and flaws in materials and weldments during the manufacture, fabrication, and construction of parts, components, and vessels in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and other ASME Codes; for example, B31.1 for Power Piping [3].BPV V members consist of representatives from manufacturers, insurance companies, architectural engineering companies, research organizations, utilities, consulting firms, and the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors. All additions, revisions, inquires, and Code Cases relating to Section V are reviewed and approved by the BPV V before adoption.

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In